Cleverpet Hub

CleverPet is a new, interactive learning console for training and keeping your dog engaged indoors.

Originally, dogs were domesticated for working and when most modern dogs are left all by themselves at home with little to do they tend to get lonely and bored thus leading to destructive behavior. The console aims to help your dog to continue learning while you are away from your home.

The console helps to keep your furry friend happy and engaged and this in turn helps to get rid of negative behavior. It can also help to train your dog to understand that rewards are attached to positive behavior. As the dog progresses, the levels also become more challenging. The console adjusts the levels in real time depending on the performance of your pet.

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How Does CleverPet Work?

The console uses revolutionary algorithms that are based on behavioral science to reward your pet once he or she learns something new. It comes with 3 sensitive touch pads designed to respond to the paw or nose of your dog. The touch pad lights up creating an interactive game with different levels that reward the dog with treats/food once he or she follows the instructions.

The console is fully automated and you can leave it on all day while you are away from the house. It carries sufficient food to feed the dog when you are away from your house. It is like a combination of a game and a high-tech slow feeder. Being a slow feeder, the console will help keep your dog healthier. This is currently the only device that can interact with your pet in such a autonomous and comprehensive way.

Another great feature that comes with the console is that you can use an app to set a schedule to see the progress of your dog in real time. The greatest thing about it is perhaps its sleek design. The console offers a wide variety of interactive games for your dog to enjoy.

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Some Levels That You Can Teach Your Dog Include:

Doggie DDR: For the dog to get a treat he or she has to press the first button that lights up then the button that lights up next and so on. As the dog gets better, the number of buttons he or she has to press in a row increases.

One Of The Lights Is Not Like The Other: All the 3 pads light up. Two of the pads are in one color but the third is in a different color. The dog then needs to press the pad of the different color.

Notice The Change: The pad remains yellow … then it is blue. When it is blue the dog needs to press it.

Quick Reaction: The middle pad lights up and the dog has to press it before it turns off.  As the game progresses the time period grows increasingly shorter.

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Videos

Subscribe to our Smart Pet Toy Youtube channel for more videos

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Features

Here are some of the features that you will find in the console:

Dog-Friendly – The console has durable rubber touch pads, a microphone for sensing the barks of the dog, a low center of gravity to avoid tipping, as well as no “bitable” parts. Injury prevention is a crucial check in any pet toy review.

Smart Dog Bowl – The console can replace your dog’s regular food bowl. It can hold enough food to feed most dog and dog breeds until you reach home. It is also compatible with a wide variety of dry food sizes.

Remote Monitoring – You get to witness the progress of your pet in real time through the app and website and view a summary of the learning of your dog over time.

Wi-Fi Connected – The console can connect to other smart devices. You can just picture the possibilities.

Never Boring – The console continually adapts to the responses of your dog to keep him or she challenged.

Totally Autonomous – Just sit back and allow the advanced algorithms to do their work. Just fill the console with food, leave it on, and leave with the understanding that your dog is learning and having fun while you are away.

Tuned Into Dogs’ Senses – The console is built to suit the natural behavior of dogs such as digging and pawing and includes sounds and lights designed for your dog’s ability to hear and see.

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Conclusion

CleverPet is truly a revolutionary device that will help your beloved pet learn and have some fun while you are away from him or her. Based on the information provided in this article it is quite clear that if your pet doesn’t already have one, you need to go out there and buy your dog a CleverPet.

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User Feedback

I waffled on spending this kind of money on "a dog toy," but I am glad I did. It is not a toy at all, but it is a trainer-fascinator-motivator-entertainer-teaching-tool for my dog. My dog is very food motivated and has progressed through the initial lessons quite quickly. I thought he was smart, but it is fun to watch him think and learn and now I think he is smarter than I thought. He is now up to lesson six where he has to start figuring out more than one light or pattern to get the kibble to appear. This is more challenging for his thought processes but he will figure this out soon.Buster Black is a food gobbler, so having his food portioned out more slowly is good for him and for his digestive tract. I cannot "free-feed" this dog like I could with my previous dogs using an "always there" big bowl of kibble. He would just eat non-stop. The CleverPet provides his daily ration, but he is still a bit confused a his meal times as to why I am not feeding him. He doesn't get it so far that he has already been fed. He is actually being fed more with the CleverPet than his normal rations because at least initially I wanted him to be able to continue to train and not interrupt his learning cycle when the food ran out. He has liked that a lot, but since I noticed he was getting a bit heavier, I have started to cut back on how much goes into the pod daily. I get a big kick out of watching Buster fixate on the tray.On day one he was afraid when it made noise but once he found out the noise meant food, that fear was gone in about an hour. Then, because he had a tendency to lay his feet on the touch pads while he laid down in front of the CleverPet, (slippery floors and laziness, I think) I had to change his approach a bit. Now his CleverPet is elevated on a large box so it is about chest height and he is learning to press the touch pads with his chin and nose instead of his feet. This is working better for him.We have all bought products that did not perform as they said it would or the materials were flimsy. You will not find that to be the case with this product. My dog is one that chews up so-called indestructible toys and has not been able to harm the CleverPet in any way. Also, it is quite heavy, so he is certainly not going to be able to pick it up and take it somewhere. The plastics used are really tough and even though Buster tried the digging-to-China approach to see if that would make it feed him, there are no scratch marks on it and it looks as good as it did when it arrived.When you get your own CleverPet, I think you will be wowed by the packaging. It comes in form-fitting protection and each part of the unpacking process comes with brilliantly numbered and identified tabs to guide you through the setup process. You will be up and running in no time at all with no confusion. I have never seen any product packaged like this. Great job, CleverPet folks!One last comment. I tend to always read the negative comments on a product first. One customer gave the CleverPet three stars because they said it was a good product but they had trouble connecting it to their WiFi because it was indicating that the login or password was wrong. I did not have this issue, but I know from experience that when any device has this issue, it is not a faulty device; just a connection issue. The fix for that problem is to bring up the list of broadcasting SSID's (router names) and tell it to forget the one that is yours. Then tell your phone or laptop to create a new network connection and type in the SSID and password for your WiFi router. That will solve the problem. It will not disrupt the connection to any other device using your WiFi, it will just fix the connection to the CleverPet or whatever device is having a problem.
ByMondaysTuesday - May 8, 2017
Day 2 and already my Shepherd mix has figured out if he steps on a light, he gets kibble. I had concerns Day 1 as he lost interest quickly in the unit when it didn't produce treats once the lights popped up, so I sent it "back" to the beginning for him using the app, and since then, it's been smooth sailing. I don't know how the future will unfold, but will update this review at the end of a week. Spending this much on a "dog toy" was a big commitment for me but coming home to find a puddle of nail polish (from a brand new bottled, that had been on a counter, wrapped in bubble wrap) in the middle of my living room rug was enough to get me to buy into it. As a "working" breed, my vet had suggested I put treats all over the house, as a sort of scavenger hunt - and that wasn't something I was wiling to do. Or to buy some of those puzzle toys (which this large dog would have destroyed I'm sure). I did try a puzzle ball, but it rolled under a couch and that was the end of that. This has him learning and entertained, and I can watch while I'm at work and see how many times a day he engages with it, which gives me comfort. So far so good!!Day 2. He's figured out the lights, and had a cup in 6 hours. The unit ran out and stopped working...I didn't know what had happened and had to figure it out, so it would be a nice feature to have it tell me on the app when that happens.
MondaysTuesday - May 25, 2017
Prefacing the review by stating - She can go in and out of the crate at will. There is a microchip cat flap on the door that opens for her.My cats love it - note that only one of my cats is actually prepared to use it properly, the others just watch/try to steal from it. But that didn't matter, because I know my cats and I predicted this outcome as I was hitting the purchase button.I knew Mimi (the 2 year old Sphynx playing it in the video) would use it, that Mao Mao (my 11 year old ex street cat) would be fascinated but too apprehensive, and that Mei Mei (the one trying to steal) would be too overcome by excitement about food that she'd never learn and would instead steal from Mimi. This is exactly what has happened, so if you are thinking about buying this for cats, I'd suggest either buying it for cats that already interact with buttons (Mimi pushes buttons on our electronic devices to get attention, her favorite is the Roomba) or getting it for a multi cat household where the odds are greater that at least one cat will interact. You can't necessarily make cats perform and that is not the fault of the product.It's also not the fault of the product that if you own multiple cats (or dogs) that it's going to be difficult to monitor their eating if one steals from it - the product is specifically designed for one animal and we accommodated Mimi by cutting out one of her meals, but Mei Mei was going to end up getting fat via stealing from it so we had to place it inside a dog crate with a Sureflap microchip door programmed for Mimi's microchip. We already had the Sureflap door, the dog crate we bought later was our solution to allow her spacious access as the feeding cupboard we used for Mimi before (feeding multiple cats is hard with Mei Mei around) would not allow us to watch her using the Cleverpet. It was also way too small to accommodate it.We've had this for two months now and she's on Challenge 9.
ByMarisa Pope - June 4, 2017
I waffled on spending this kind of money on "a dog toy," but I am glad I did. It is not a toy at all, but it is a trainer-fascinator-motivator-entertainer-teaching-tool for my dog. My dog is very food motivated and has progressed through the initial lessons quite quickly. I thought he was smart, but it is fun to watch him think and learn and now I think he is smarter than I thought. He is now up to lesson six where he has to start figuring out more than one light or pattern to get the kibble to appear. This is more challenging for his thought processes but he will figure this out soon.Buster Black is a food gobbler, so having his food portioned out more slowly is good for him and for his digestive tract. I cannot "free-feed" this dog like I could with my previous dogs using an "always there" big bowl of kibble. He would just eat non-stop. The CleverPet provides his daily ration, but he is still a bit confused a his meal times as to why I am not feeding him. He doesn't get it so far that he has already been fed. He is actually being fed more with the CleverPet than his normal rations because at least initially I wanted him to be able to continue to train and not interrupt his learning cycle when the food ran out. He has liked that a lot, but since I noticed he was getting a bit heavier, I have started to cut back on how much goes into the pod daily. I get a big kick out of watching Buster fixate on the tray.On day one he was afraid when it made noise but once he found out the noise meant food, that fear was gone in about an hour. Then, because he had a tendency to lay his feet on the touch pads while he laid down in front of the CleverPet, (slippery floors and laziness, I think) I had to change his approach a bit. Now his CleverPet is elevated on a large box so it is about chest height and he is learning to press the touch pads with his chin and nose instead of his feet. This is working better for him.We have all bought products that did not perform as they said it would or the materials were flimsy. You will not find that to be the case with this product. My dog is one that chews up so-called indestructible toys and has not been able to harm the CleverPet in any way. Also, it is quite heavy, so he is certainly not going to be able to pick it up and take it somewhere. The plastics used are really tough and even though Buster tried the digging-to-China approach to see if that would make it feed him, there are no scratch marks on it and it looks as good as it did when it arrived.When you get your own CleverPet, I think you will be wowed by the packaging. It comes in form-fitting protection and each part of the unpacking process comes with brilliantly numbered and identified tabs to guide you through the setup process. You will be up and running in no time at all with no confusion. I have never seen any product packaged like this. Great job, CleverPet folks!One last comment. I tend to always read the negative comments on a product first. One customer gave the CleverPet three stars because they said it was a good product but they had trouble connecting it to their WiFi because it was indicating that the login or password was wrong. I did not have this issue, but I know from experience that when any device has this issue, it is not a faulty device; just a connection issue. The fix for that problem is to bring up the list of broadcasting SSID's (router names) and tell it to forget the one that is yours. Then tell your phone or laptop to create a new network connection and type in the SSID and password for your WiFi router. That will solve the problem. It will not disrupt the connection to any other device using your WiFi, it will just fix the connection to the CleverPet or whatever device is having a problem.
ByMondaysTuesday - May 8, 2017
Day 2 and already my Shepherd mix has figured out if he steps on a light, he gets kibble. I had concerns Day 1 as he lost interest quickly in the unit when it didn't produce treats once the lights popped up, so I sent it "back" to the beginning for him using the app, and since then, it's been smooth sailing. I don't know how the future will unfold, but will update this review at the end of a week. Spending this much on a "dog toy" was a big commitment for me but coming home to find a puddle of nail polish (from a brand new bottled, that had been on a counter, wrapped in bubble wrap) in the middle of my living room rug was enough to get me to buy into it. As a "working" breed, my vet had suggested I put treats all over the house, as a sort of scavenger hunt - and that wasn't something I was wiling to do. Or to buy some of those puzzle toys (which this large dog would have destroyed I'm sure). I did try a puzzle ball, but it rolled under a couch and that was the end of that. This has him learning and entertained, and I can watch while I'm at work and see how many times a day he engages with it, which gives me comfort. So far so good!!Day 2. He's figured out the lights, and had a cup in 6 hours. The unit ran out and stopped working...I didn't know what had happened and had to figure it out, so it would be a nice feature to have it tell me on the app when that happens.
MondaysTuesday - May 25, 2017
Prefacing the review by stating - She can go in and out of the crate at will. There is a microchip cat flap on the door that opens for her.My cats love it - note that only one of my cats is actually prepared to use it properly, the others just watch/try to steal from it. But that didn't matter, because I know my cats and I predicted this outcome as I was hitting the purchase button.I knew Mimi (the 2 year old Sphynx playing it in the video) would use it, that Mao Mao (my 11 year old ex street cat) would be fascinated but too apprehensive, and that Mei Mei (the one trying to steal) would be too overcome by excitement about food that she'd never learn and would instead steal from Mimi. This is exactly what has happened, so if you are thinking about buying this for cats, I'd suggest either buying it for cats that already interact with buttons (Mimi pushes buttons on our electronic devices to get attention, her favorite is the Roomba) or getting it for a multi cat household where the odds are greater that at least one cat will interact. You can't necessarily make cats perform and that is not the fault of the product.It's also not the fault of the product that if you own multiple cats (or dogs) that it's going to be difficult to monitor their eating if one steals from it - the product is specifically designed for one animal and we accommodated Mimi by cutting out one of her meals, but Mei Mei was going to end up getting fat via stealing from it so we had to place it inside a dog crate with a Sureflap microchip door programmed for Mimi's microchip. We already had the Sureflap door, the dog crate we bought later was our solution to allow her spacious access as the feeding cupboard we used for Mimi before (feeding multiple cats is hard with Mei Mei around) would not allow us to watch her using the Cleverpet. It was also way too small to accommodate it.We've had this for two months now and she's on Challenge 9.
ByMarisa Pope - June 4, 2017

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I have loved pets ever since I was four and my parents got a dog. Since then, I have had a few dogs and one cat. One thing that was always difficult is combining my pet’s needs with my job and social life. Sitting at home (alone) is not good for them, they either become lethargic or anxious.

When I first heard of the pet cameras and smart pet toys, I was instantly fascinated. As an engineer, I could see how this technology was going to help people around the world. And I wanted to be part of that development by testing and writing about it.

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